Food Safety & Snack Attack!

Rachel is a registered Dietitian and runs our Snack Attack program at the Discovery Center. Snack Attack is a program where children learn how to make nutritious snacks in s safe kitchen environment. Learn more about proper food handling and safety in the first video of our series.

Do That Science! Van de Graaff Generator

Van de Graaff generators create an electrostatic charge. The original machine was made to help with particle accelerators back in the 20’s. Now it is mostly used for static electricity experiments…like making hair stand up.

Static electricity is created when electrons jump from one material to another. Think about when you rub your shoes on the carpet then touch a doorknob…or a friend. Or, when you rub a balloon on your head and your hair stands up. These are small scale charges. Static electricity can come in big forms too. Lightning is the biggest example or a static charge.

For more Do That Science! go to https://dothat.science

 

Discovery at Home: Become a Bird Observer

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Become a Bird Observer!

Birds are all around us. They are extremely diverse by type and gender, yet the same in that they all have beaks, lay eggs, and are the only animals with feathers.

https://www.dkfindout.com/us/animals-and-nature/birds/types-beak/

Birds are helpful by pollinating flowers, distributing seeds, eating problem bugs like mosquitos, and keeping rodent populations down.  Their songs are beautiful and distinct.

Become a bird scientist by observing birds’ behaviors. Where do you see them – in trees, at feeders, on the water? Are they little like a sparrow or the size of a robin or goose? What colors are they?

If you know the answer to these few questions, you can figure out what kind of bird they are, learn what they eat (notice their beaks for a clue), and hear what they sound like by using a free application from Cornell University called Merlin Bird ID.

And if you want, you can help other scientists track birds by reporting what you see. Have fun!

For more information:

Cornell and Merlin Bird ID: https://merlin.allaboutbirds.org

 

Watch HERE for a Story Time for Young Learners

Bird Beak Types:  https://www.dkfindout.com/us/animals-and-nature/birds/types-beak/

 

 


¡Sé un observador de aves!

Los pájaros están a nuestro alrededor. Son extremadamente diversos por tipo y género, pero lo mismo en que todos tienen picos, huevos ponen, y son los únicos animales con plumas. Las aves son útiles polinizando flores, distribuyendo semillas, comiendo insectos problemáticos como mosquitos y manteniendo las poblaciones de roedores abajo. Sus canciones son hermosas y distintas.

Sea un científico de aves observando los comportamientos de las aves. ¿Dónde los ves, en los árboles, en los comederos, en el agua? ¿Son pequeños como un gorrión o del tamaño de un petirrojo o un ganso? ¿Qué colores son? 

Si usted sabe la respuesta a estas pocas preguntas, se puede averiguar qué tipo de pájaro son, aprender lo que comen (notar sus picos para una pista), y escuchar lo que suenan mediante el uso de una aplicación gratuita de la Universidad de Cornell llamada Merlin Bird ID. Si lo desea, puede ayudar a otros científicos a rastrear aves informando de lo que ve. ¡Que te diviertas!

Para más information:

Cornell y Merlin Bird ID: https://merlin.allaboutbirds.org 

Tiempo de historia para jóvenes estudiantes:  https://www.facebook.com/discoverycenter/videos/1172779333083264/

Tipos de pico de pájarohttps://www.dkfindout.com/us/animals-and-nature/birds/types-beak/

Discovery at Home: Celebrating Freedom

Friday is June 19th – a special day commemorating the day back in 1865 when slavery was abolished in Texas, and more generally, the emancipation of African American slaves throughout the Confederate South. Here, thanks to Colors of Us (https://coloursofus.com ) are some great children’s books celebrating Juneteenth, for Elementary School, Middle School and High School students.

Visit here for annotations: https://coloursofus.com/10-childrens-books-celebrating-juneteenth/

Brainiac Jr Trivia at the Ascend Train Depot

While the Discovery Center is closed, we are bringing you trivia from inside! On Sunday evenings, we are set-up and go LIVE inside the building to bring you your favorite exhibits and challenge your minds.  You can play along from your home on our Facebook page and play against other contestants, or you watch here and challenge yourself, your siblings or your parents!

Jon, from Brainiac Trivia, hosts an interactive game with fun trivia for ages 5-12. How many will YOU get right?

This time, we are set-up inside the Ascend Federal Credit Union Train Depot!

Discovery at Home: Be an EarthWORMologist

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Be an EarthWORMologist 

Earthworms are awesome – they break down leaves and dirt and make tunnels that aerate our gardens and farms. They create nourishment for plants and pathways for air and water. Worms are wonderful to observe – the worm farm below makes it easy to see the incredible tunnels earthworms create. By observing, learning and appreciating worms, you can become an EarthWORMologist!

Materials:

  • Clear plastic jar or 1 or 2-liter soda bottle container with top removed
  • Smaller plastic container 
  • Dirt
  • Sand
  • Gravel/Stones
  • Water 
  • Lid with air holes (or plastic wrap with air holes attached with rubber band)
  • Water
  • Used coffee grounds or oatmeal for food
  • Black cloth or construction paper
  • Earthworms

Find a plastic see-through jar or cut off the top of a 1- or 2-liter plastic soda bottle. Find a smaller container to put in the middle – perhaps an old spice container. (This will push the dirt toward the edges and prevent the worms from hiding in the middle so that you can see the tunnels they make.) After placing the smaller container into the larger one, add alternating layers of dirt and sand, each about an inch deep. Moisten as you go. If available, a bottom layer of gravel would be a great addition just in case of overwatering. Be sure to add some food.

Go outside and dig for worms. Worms like it cool, damp and dark. The best time to find worms is the evening. If looking in daytime, dig in shady, damp areas. These invertebrates breathe through their skin, so they must stay damp and cool. They have a mucus-like substance on their skin. Earthworms are segmented, and have bristles that help them move through the earth. They ‘hear’ by sensing vibrations. Place them in the prepared jar and cover with dark cloth or paper. Don’t disturb for a few days. Then remove the covering and check for tunnels. If you intend to keep your worms more than a few days, be sure to keep them moist, in a dark location, and to add food.

Visit Facebook SPARK Live to learn more about worms and hear a book about worms. 


Ser un EarthWORMologist 

Las lombrices son impresionantes- descomponen las hojas y la suciedad y hacen túneles que airean nuestros jardines y granjas. Crean alimento para las plantas y caminos para el aire y el agua. Las lombrices son maravillosas de observar – la granja de lombrices más abajo hace fácil para observar los increíbles túneles que crean las lombrices. Al observar, aprender, y apreciar las lombrices, ¡puedes convertirte en un “EarthWORMologist”!  

Materiales:

  • Tarro de plástico transparente o 1 or 2-litro botella plástica sin tapa
  • contenedor de plástico más pequeño
  • suciedad
  • arena
  • grava/piedras
  • agua 
  • Tapa con orificios de aire (o envoltura de plástico con orificios de aire unidos con banda de goma)
  • Cosita usada o avena para alimentos
  • tela o paper negra
  • Lombrices

Encuentres un frasco transparente de plástico o corte la parte superior de una botella de refresco de plástico de 1 o 2 litros. Encuentres un recipiente más pequeño para poner en el medio , tal vez un viejo recipiente de especias. (Esto empujará la suciedad hacia los bordes y evitará que los gusanos se escondan en el medio para que pueda ver los túneles que hacen.) Después de colocar el recipiente más pequeño en el más grande, agregue capas alternas de tierra y arena, cada una de aproximadamente una pulgada de profundidad. Humedeces sobre la marcha. Si está disponible, una capa inferior de grava sería una gran adición en caso de sobreagua. Asegúrate de agregar algo de comida.

Sal afuera y buscas gusanos. A los gusanos les gusta fresco, húmedo y oscuro. El mejor momento para encontrar gusanos es la noche. Si mira durante el día, cavar en áreas sombreadas y húmedas. Estos invertebrados respiran a través de su piel, por lo que deben permanecer húmedos y frescos. Tienen una sustancia similar a la mucosidad en su piel. Las lombrices de tierra están segmentadas y tienen cerdas que les ayudan a moverse a través de la tierra. Ellos ‘escuchan’ detectando vibraciones. Colóquelos en el frasco preparado y cúbralos con un paño o papel oscuro. No molestes por unos días. A continuación, retire la cubierta y compruebe si hay túneles. Si tienes la intención de mantener sus gusanos más de unos días, asegúrate de mantenerlos húmedos, en un lugar oscuro, y agregar alimentos.

Visitas Facebook SPARK Live para obtener más información sobre los gusanos y escuchar un libro sobre gusanos. 

Do That Science! Water Rockets

A little over a week ago, on May 30th, we had the first manned space launch from the USA in a decade! How awesome is that?!?

This week we thought we would take another look at rockets. Four forces act on a rocket during launch. As we are shooting off our water rockets, see if you can pick them out. If you can, grab your own water rocket launcher and a bike pump and try it out at home.

Thrust- This is the pressure at the end of the nozzle propelling the rocket.

Weight- The mass of the rocket and the pull of gravity trying to bring it back down.

Lift- The force that holds up the rocket (or an airplane) and counters the force of weight.

Drag- Force pushing back on the rocket as it moves through the air.

Check out this link for more details about these 4 forces. https://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/roc…

NASA has put together a deep set of lessons, virtual simulators, and instructions for taking water rockets to the next level. You can find that here! https://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/roc…

For more Do That Science! go to https://dothat.science

Brainiac Jr Trivia at the Nissan Super Service Center

While the Discovery Center is closed, we are bringing you trivia from inside! On Sunday evenings, we are set-up and go LIVE inside the building to bring you your favorite exhibits and challenge your minds.  You can play along from your home on our Facebook page and play against other contestants, or you watch here and challenge yourself, your siblings or your parents!

Jon, from Brainiac Trivia, hosts an interactive game with fun trivia for ages 5-12. How many will YOU get right?

This time, we are set-up in front of the Nissan Super Service Center!

Discovery at Home: Celebrating Being the Same & Different

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There are many ways to help children develop positive attitudes towards others from both similar and different backgrounds. Celebrate the many ways we are the same and different with your children by reading or listening on line to one of the following books! There are on-line read-alouds for each one. Thanks to Penn State University for this annotated list.

The Sneeches by Dr. Seuss

In this story the star-belly and plain-belly Sneeches learn that neither type is superior and that they are able to get along and become friends.

The Color of Us by Karen Katz

This story explores how everyone in the neighborhood is a different shade of brown –
from peanut butter to chocolate – and does a great job of subtly explaining that people are all different shades of the same color.

Why Am I Different by Norma Simon

This book outlines the variety of ways people can be different from each other including hair color, size, language, and family.

It’s OK to be Different by Todd Parr

The author explores sensitive issues such as adoption and unusual things such as eating macaroni in the bathtub, but manages to explore diversity in all forms.

Find additional information here: https://extension.psu.edu/programs/betterkidcare/knowledge-areas/environment-curriculum/activities/all-activities/we-are-different-we-are-the-same-teaching-young-children-about-diversity

 

A 60-minute special “Coming Together: Standing Up to Racism” by CNN/Sesame Street Town Hall for Kids and Families” will air on Saturday, June 6, at 9:00 a.m. CT. The show will talk to kids about racism, the recent nationwide protests, embracing diversity and being more empathetic and understanding

.https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/02/us/cnn-sesame-street-standing-up-to-racism/index.html

 

 

 


Hay muchas maneras de ayudar a los niños a desarrollar actitudes positivas hacia otras personas de orígenes similares y diferentes. ¡Celebra las muchas maneras en que somos iguales y diferentes con tus hijos leyendo o escuchando en línea uno de los siguientes libros! Hay lecturas en línea para cada uno. Gracias a la Universidad Estatal de Penn por esta lista anotada.

The Sneeches by Dr. Seuss

En esta historia, los Sneeches de vientre estelar y vientre llano aprenden que ninguno de los dos tipos es superior y que son capaces de llevarse bien y hacerse amigos.

The Color of Us by Karen Katz

Esta historia explora cómo todos en el vecindario es un tono diferente de marrón, desde mantequilla de maní hasta chocolate, y hace un gran trabajo de explicar sutilmente que las personas son todos diferentes tonos del mismo color.

Why Am I Different by Norma Simon

Este libro describe la variedad de maneras en que las personas pueden ser diferentes entre sí, incluyendo el color del cabello, el tamaño, el idioma y la familia.

It’s OK to be Different by Todd Parr

El autor explora temas sensibles como la adopción y cosas inusuales como comer macarrones en la bañera, pero logra explorar la diversidad en todas sus formas.

Encuentre información adicional aquí: https://extension.psu.edu/programs/betterkidcare/knowledge-areas/environment-curriculum/activities/all-activities/we-are-different-we-are-the-same-teaching-young-children-about-diversity

At Home Scavenger Hunt

Looking for something fun to do while at home? Here is a fun at-home scavenger hunt that you can do.  Some internet, some photos and some good old-fashioned hunting. Have fun and share some photos on Facebook or Instagram and tag the Discovery Center. We’d love to see how you are learning at home!

Download the scavenger hunt and play at home!

Brainiac Jr Trivia at the Water Table

While the Discovery Center is closed, we are bringing you trivia from inside! On Sunday evenings, we are set-up and go LIVE inside the building to bring you your favorite exhibits and challenge your minds.  You can play along from your home on our Facebook page and play against other contestants, or you watch here and challenge yourself, your siblings or your parents!

Jon, from Brainiac Trivia, hosts an interactive game with fun trivia for ages 5-12. How many will YOU get right?

This time, we are set-up in front of the water table!